Want to Know: Going to the Theater ~ By: Florence Ducatteau

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3 Stars

I received a NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Continue reading

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The Sea Kings Daughter + The Baker’s Dozen ~ By: Aaron Shepard (Reviews!)

Since these were a similar type of book, and they were by the same author, I decided to combine them into one post. Continue reading

Guess the Book from the Terrible Drawing

I thought that I would share this with you all. I did this yesterday, and was laughing quite a bit!

Check out the Buzzfeed article here.

Essentially you are given a particularly bad drawing of a fairly well-known book, and then you have to guess what you think it is. The pictures tend to be quite funny, though the third was my favorite: Continue reading

40 Hidden Artworks Painted on the Edges of Books

Today I learned that people used to paint beautiful images on the edges of books. I think I am going to do some of my own research on the topic, it must be interesting to learn their technique. The post was interesting, so I thought that I would share it with all of you.

TwistedSifter

A fore-edge painting is a technique of painting on the edges of the pages of a book. The artwork can only be seen when the pages are fanned, as seen in the animation below. When the book is closed, you don’t see the image because it is hidden by the gilding (i.e., the gold leaf applied to the edges of the page).

fore-edge painting fanning animated gif

According to Encyclopedia Britannica, fore-edge paintings first arose during the European Middle Ages but came to prominence during the mid-17th century to the late 19th century. Anne C. Bromer for the Boston Public Library writes, “Most fore-edge painters working for binding firms did not sign their work, which explains why it is difficult to pinpoint and date the hidden paintings.”

Thanks to the generous gifts from Anne and David Bromer and Albert H. Wiggin, the Boston Public Library holds one of the finest collections of fore-edge paintings…

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